5 tools to increase your writing productivity

 

tools-increase-writing-productivity

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In a recent post, I discussed three ways to increase your writing output. This post is in a similar vein, but angled more towards how tools such as apps and technology can help improve your writing productivity. So without further ado, let’s get to it!

Pomodoro Technique

If you haven’t heard of the Pomodoro technique, then read on, as I guarantee you’ll love it.

Basically, it’s a time management method that forces you to focus for a set period of time, then rewards you with a break. You set a period of time you want to focus for, say 25 minutes, and the amount of time for your break, say 10 minutes. Then you go for it! Head down, bum up for 25 minutes of writing, and when the timer goes off you get to have a break. Go check social media, grab a cuppa, do some housework, read a book – whatever you like. Then when that timer goes off, it’s time to focus again. Set and repeat!

I’ve used this method on or off during periods where I really need to get the writing done and it’s worked a treat. And although you can get special apps such as Focus Keeper or Be Focused, but you can also just use the timer on your phone.

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Writing Sprints

Twitter is a great place to connect with fellow writers, and particularly writers who are motivated. A writing sprint is where you join with other writers, set a time and a time frame to write for and then go for it. You then check back into Twitter to share how you went, and cheer on others. You might like to join in at 5am with the #5amWritersClub or it perhaps find a more sociable hour by searching #writingsprint on Twitter. Either way, it’s a great way to get the writing done and make connections.

And remember, it doesn’t have to take place on Twitter. Anywhere there is a community of writers, you’ll find a writers’ sprint happening. And if you can’t find one, start one yourself!

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Evernote

Evernote is a fantastic desktop and mobile/tablet app that helps you organise and store media files. It’s perfect for collecting and storing online information, bookmarking websites and pages, and so forth when researching for your novel. You can create folders and files and save items where it will make for easy access. And as it’s a cloud based application, all your files will be available across all your devices, whenever you need them. I know I would be lost in a time-consuming junk-heap of information without Evernote.

Want to know more? — What is evernote?

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Scrivener

Scrivener is the number one writing software. While Word is easy to use and certainly does the job, Scrivener will take your writing to a whole new level by allowing you to organise chapters, move scenes around easily, file your research for easy access, have your novel outline, chapter summaries, and story in one place, and much much more.

I must admit I haven’t grasped all of Scrivener’s many applications, but I did do The Australian Writers’ Centre ‘Scrivener Power’ course hosted by proud Scrivener lover Natasha Lester, which I highly recommend. In fact, I think I’m going to do a bit of a refresher before I get stuck into writing my next book.

Check out Scrivener

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Freedom

Along with procrastination, social media and the internet is a huge distraction for writers. The Freedom app is the perfect solution. Freedom allows you to block your access to the internet for a period of time. So even if you’re tempted to just check-in on Facebook (in the name of research of course), you won’t be able to. You may as well just keep writing. I like to use it in conjunction with the Pomodoro method – double killer!

Freedom is just one of a number of internet blocking apps out there. Here’s a great list so you can find the one that works best for you.

 

Do you have any tools that help increase your writing productivity? Share them in the comments or over on my Facebook page. 

 

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